It’s a Shawl, It’s a Scarf, That’s a Wrap

It’s the first of March and that means it is National Crochet Month. To celebrate crochet CGOA is having a Mega Crochet Along with 4 patterns. There will be a new pattern from a different designer every week free to CGOA members.

I’m happy to announce that the first pattern for this celebration is my “Shining Day Wrap”. This wrap is worked in 2 pieces off a center foundation to create a wide lacy rectangle that can be worn as a shawl or scarf. It looks very fancy and complicated, but it is actually an easy pattern to learn.

This pattern includes stitch charts, text instructions and a photo-tutorial on working picots. There is everything you need to successfully crochet your own wrap, even if you are new to crochet. The pattern will be available for free to both CGOA members and non-members on the CGOA website: crochet.org thru March 7th. You will be able to download the pattern PDF thru the CGOA store.

Starting March 8th my pattern will be available for purchase in my Ravelry shop and there will be a new pattern available to CGOA members each of the following 3 weeks.

 

 

Happy Valentine’s Day

Dainty Hearts Motifs by Andee Graves at “I Like Crochet”

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day and I have one more thing to share with you.  The folks at “I Like Crochet” online magazine are offering a special Valentine’s sale of their subscriptions.

You can use this link to get the offer on their website. Remember the sale is only going on until February 18th.

Pocket Full of Love (Gift Card Holder)

Valentines Day is next week and I’m always dreaming up something fun to celebrate the holiday with my family. This quick little pocket takes only a few hours to crochet up and very little sewing to finish. It’s handy for teacher gifts too.

The trickiest part is attaching the heart as a pocket on the envelope flap. I’ve included a stitch chart with additional information to help you thru this part.

Pocket Full of Love Gift Card Holder

Designed by Andee Graves

Skill level:       Intermediate

Finished Size:

3 ½” wide x 3” tall

Materials:

Yarn

Worsted wt: Sample uses Berroco Yarns “Ultra Wool” 100% Superwash Wool (3.5 oz/100g, 219 yd/200 m)

Color A: #3326 River (sample used approximately 31 yards/14 grams)

Color B: #3310 Alyssum (sample used approximately 11 yards/5 grams)

Hooks

H / 5mm

Notions

Button

Yarn/tapestry needle

Stitch markers

Gauge

8 stitches and 7 rows in Envelope stitch pattern = 2”

Heart 3” tall and 3.25” wide

Abbreviations/Special Stitches

Joining slip st (slip st): Insert hook in indicated place, YO, pull up a loop thru place and loop on hook, continue to pull up on working loop until original loop is tight.

Picot Point st (picot): Ch 1, Insert hook in previous stitch using front loop and top side loop, YO, pull loop thru stitch and loop on hook and tighten. If you need help working this stitch I have a tutorial on this blog post, it also has some additional help on crocheting rounds 1-2 of the heart used for this project.

Pattern Notes:

Envelope is worked in the round off a chain foundation for 10 rounds, then the flap is worked off half those stitches ending with a button loop. Beginning tail is used to sew the button to the base of the envelope.

Heart pocket is crocheted onto the flap point with the 3rd round of heart stitches, the ending tail is used to sew the last couple of stitches. 12 single crochet stitches at top of heart are left unattached for pocket opening.

Instructions

Gift Card Envelope

Rnd 1: Begin with Color A, leave a 10 inch long tail, Ch 15, working in back bumps: sc in second ch from hook, (dc in next ch, sc in next ch) 6 times, dc in next st, Turn to work along bottom of foundation chain using remaining 2 free loops: sc in first st, (dc in next ch, sc in next ch) 6 times, dc in next st, slip st join to first sc of Rnd. [14 sc, 14 dc]

Rnd 2: Ch 1, turn, sc in first dc, (dc next sc, sc next dc) 13 times, dc in last st, slip st join to first sc of Rnd.

Rnds 3 – 10: Repeat Rnd 2.

Envelope Flap

Rows 11-15: Ch 1, turn, sc in first dc, (dc next sc, sc next dc) 6 times, dc next sc. [7 sc, 7 dc]

Row 16: Ch 1, turn, skip first st, (dc next sc, sc next dc) 6 times. [6 sc, 6 dc]

Row 17: Ch 1, turn, skip first st, (sc next dc, dc next sc) 4 times, sc next 2 sts. [6 sc, 4 dc]

Row 18: Ch 1, turn, skip first st, (dc next sc, sc next dc) 4 times. [4 sc, 4 dc]

Row 19: Ch 1, turn, skip first st, (sc next dc, dc next sc) 2 times, sc next 2 sts. [4 sc, 2 dc]

Row 20: Ch 1, turn, skip first st, (dc next sc, sc next dc) 2 times. [2 sc, 2 dc]

Row 21: Ch 1, turn skip first st, sc next 2 sts. [2 sc]

Row 22: Ch 3, turn, skip 1 st, dc in last st. Button hole created. Fasten off [1 ch-3 sp, 1 dc]

Weave in ending tail, weave beginning tail to center of pocket bottom to sew on button

Heart Pocket

Rnd 1: With Color B, start with an Adjustable Slip Knot, ch 4, 12 dc in 4th ch from hook, sl st in top of ch-4.

Rnd 2: Sk 2 sts, 7 Tr in next st, dc next st, 2 dc next 2 sts, 4 dc in next st, 2 dc next 2 sts, dc next st, 7 Tr next st, sl st between last dc and join of Round 1. DO NOT FASTEN OFF. Weave in center tail

Rnd 3 (attaching Heart Pocket to Envelope Flap):

ch 1, starting with first Treble of Round 2 – (sc in next st, 2 sc next st) 2 times, sc next 2 sts,

Use st marker to attach the heart WS to RS point of flap (insert marker between second and third dc of bottom 4 dc

and into unworked sc of Row 20),

working thru both heart and flap: sc in same st as previous st, sc in next 2 sts,

working thru heart only: sc again in previous st,

working thru heart and flap: sc in next 6 sts,

working thru heart only: sc again in previous st, ch 1 and slip st in top of last sc made {picot point made}, remove stitch marker, sc next st,

working thru heart and flap: sc again in previous st, sc next 5 sts,

working thru heart only: sc next st,

working thru heart and flap: sc again in previous st, sc next 2 sts,

working thru heart only: sc again in previous st, (sc next st, 2 sc next st) 2 times, sc last st, slip st to first sc of round.

Fasten off with a 10-12 inch long tail.

Finishing

Using ending tail of heart, weave thru 6 sc from joining slip st, sew 2 sc to flap, weave across wrong side of heart to opposite side and sew 2 sc to flap. Look to Heart stitch chart for clarification.

Using beginning tail of envelope, sew on button at bottom of envelope for closure.

Moving Right Along

It’s been over a week since my last post, 2018 has picked up it’s heels and is moving fast already.  On the 10th I had my first CGOA Board meeting and I came out of that realizing that I have a lot to learn about and a lot to do in the next few months.

I also have a number of design projects with deadlines coming up soon. Funny how deadlines in 2018 seemed so far away back in early December, but now they are breathing down my neck.  I’m looking forward to sharing these designs with all of you soon.

In the meantime you can find my latest pattern the Morning Walk Earwarmer in the February Issue of “I Like Crochet”. This is a fun quick-to-crochet project that uses different stitch heights to create a narrow to wide shaping. Earwarmers are especially handy headgear for folks with long hair. They can serve double duty as a hairband as well as keeping the chill off your ears.

I wanted to create an earwarmer that had a little extra thickness over the ears as well as some flexibility in fit. The widest part of the design is a textured stitch with a little bit of open work, then it narrows into ribbing that fits snugly over the ears. Both the top and bottom opening have textured stitch work to create a soft face flattering edge.

I’ve also been doing some clearing of the clutter in my yarn and fiber stashes. I had purchased this fun Noro product last summer. It isn’t really yarn but a very narrow piece of fiber without any twist. That means it tends to break easily and I’ve been using bits of it when doing needle felting projects.

I decided the other day that it would be good to felt in the washing machine because of the lack of twist. I spent about 6 hours carefully crocheting the remainder of the original roll into a rectangular piece of fabric. I used half-double crochet stitches worked in rows.

This was a good brainless crochet project when I was watching shows and movies with my kiddos during the evenings and weekend. I like having something to crochet that is the same stitch over and over where I can keep my hands busy without a great deal of focus. It was also entertaining to see how the colors were going to come together, something I always love about working with long color changes.

My current plan is that the felted fabric will become a bag of some sort, but it will depend on how much shrinkage I get and what happens with the colors when I finish the felting. It could possibly become the background for a needle-felted painting.

Sparkling Ice Snowflake

Row of Sparkling Ice Snowflakes - Andee Graves M2H Designs 

It is Winter up here on my mountain again, though technically it is still Autumn on the calendar. We have had numerous snow storms and a number of days that the temperatures barely crawled above freezing. I’m looking forward to the days of winter when the air sparkles with snowflakes in the sunshine.

I’m happy for the colder weather though, as it has helped me feel more in the mood for Christmas time.

I’m listening to my Christmas music and will be digging out my Christmas movies for watching after we’ve eaten our Thanksgiving dinner. Having gotten into a Christmas mood I’ve decided to get a head start on my Christmas gifts, and especially my gift to all my lovely readers.

Yes, my friends, it is time for a snowflake design again. This year I’m giving us all a bit more time to work on the new snowflakes. That way you can send some out with your Christmas cards if you want.

Not only do I have a pattern for you, but I am also including a photo tutorial on stiffening your snowflakes. Pattern first, since you’ll need some snowflakes to work with.

Sparkling Ice Snowflake

Designed by Andee Graves

Skill level: Easy

Materials:

Size 3 Cotton Crochet Thread with hook size: B (2.25mm)

Size 10 Cotton Crochet Thread with hook size: Steel 0 (1.75mm)

Notions

Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Gauge

Gauge is not critical to this project.

Instructions

Rnd 1: Starting with Adjustable Slip Knot {if you need help with this technique check out my YouTube Video}, ch 2, 12 sc in second ch from hook, slip st to first sc of Rnd. {12 sc}

Rnd 2: Ch 1, (2 sc in next st, ch 1, skip 1 st) 6 times, slip st to first sc of Rnd. {12 sc, 6 ch-1 sp}

Rnd 3: Ch 1, sc in next 2 sts (ch 6, skip next ch-1 sp, sc in next 2 sts) 5 times, ch 6, skip next ch-1 sp, slip st to first sc of Rnd. {12 sc, 6 ch-6 loops}

Rnd 4: Ch 1, [(sc, hdc, 3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc, hdc, sc) in next ch-6 loop] 6 times, slip st to first sc of Rnd. {12 sc, 12 hdc, 36 dc, 6 ch-3 sp}

Rnd 5: Slip st in next hdc, *sc in next st, ch 3, skip next st, dc in next st, ch 2, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in ch-3 sp, ch 2, dc in next st, ch 3, skip 1 st, sc in next st,** skip 4 sts*; Repeat from * to * 4 times, Repeat from * to ** once, slip st to first sc of Rnd. Fasten off {12 sc, 30 dc, 6 ch-1 sp, 12 ch-2 sp, 12 ch-3 sp}

Finishing

Weave in all ends. Block snowflake and use favorite stiffening method.

 

If this snowflake doesn’t please you, I have 3 other snowflake patterns available here on the blog:

Frozen Star – Pattern available here.

 

Lacy Snowflake – Pattern available here for free text instructions only.

Or your can purchase the pattern in my Ravelry shop, this version includes a stitch chart as well as text instructions.

 

Little Snowflake Ornament – Pattern available here.

 

Stiffening Your Snowflakes

When stiffening your snowflakes you want to consider the climate you live in. Especially the humidity of your region will effect what stiffening agent you should choose, as well as how you want to set up your drying area.

The basic supplies you will need to stiffen your crocheted snowflakes are:

Pins – Nickel-plated or rust proof pins are best, otherwise you can end up with rust marks on your finished snowflakes. My favorites to use are nickel-plated T-pins, Size 16, 1 inch long.

Waterproof (or resistant) Surface – You want to use something that will hold the pins firmly in place and can either be thrown away or washed off.  Wax or Parchment paper over cardboard is an affordable option. Afterward the paper goes in the bin and the cardboard can be recycled or re-used if not too punctured. I didn’t have wax paper in the house for this latest batch of snowflakes so I used Press-n-Seal plastic over my surface. I liked using one of my foam blocking board as it held the pins better than cardboard.

Stiffening Agent – This can be anything that is initially wet enough to be absorbed in the cotton of your stitches without obscuring them, and that dries rigid. I use a product I purchase at my local Michaels store called “Stiffy” from the Plaid company (same folks that make Mod Podge), but something like PVA school glue can work too.

Some of the PVA glues are a little too flexible when dry, so if you want a more rigid finished object you can try adding a bit of corn starch to the glue. If your glue is too thick, you can experiment with adding water to thin it. I use distilled water when doing this. I find a very thin liquid to be best for maintaining the stitch definition of my snowflakes.

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

Brush and Bowl – No matter what application method you prefer you will need both of these objects. If you are planning on using the “soak” method you will want a bowl wide enough that your snowflake will fit inside it. For your brush you will want stiff short bristles, that can help get the stiffening solution down into the stitches or help remove excess solution from the pinned snowflake.

Drying Surface – An old towel or a piece of fine metal screening. If you live in a humid climate you really want a drying surface that lets air circulate around your snowflakes, you might even want to use a fan or a blow-dryer on a low setting. I tend to use a dry towel or a

Getting Started

Obviously you first want to crochet your snowflakes, I like to have a pile to work with before I begin the stiffening process. Sometimes I will wet block my snowflakes first. The pinning process is the same as when I am stiffening my snowflakes.

If your snowflake is crocheted tightly and you wet block it with pinning you may have a stable shape without additional stiffening. Or it will hold the shape well enough to just brush on the stiffener without it being pinned. You will want to experiment.

I prefer to use the brush method of applying the stiffener as it helps me keep better stitch definition. If you want to do the soak method you will immerse your snowflake in your solution, then remove it from the solution letting excess drain off. Proceed to pin the snowflake to the desired shape. Once you have the snowflake pinned out, use paper towels to blot off excess solution. Be careful during the blotting that you don’t glue bits of paper towel to your snowflake.

In this demonstration we are trying to get a symmetrical looking snowflake. I approach the pinning like stretching a drumhead (something I learnt from my younger brother, Cy the Drum Guy).

Pinning dry 1 - Andee Graves M2H Designs

This means securing one point on the snowflake then stretching to the opposite point, continuing to work around the points of the snowflake back and forth.

Center and Pts pinned dry - Andee Graves M2H Designs

It can be helpful to also place pins in the center of the snowflake after securing the first 2 points. This is especially helpful with really open stitch work, it will keep the other 4 points from pulling it off center. I remove the center pins once I’ve got the 6 points secured.

Pinning dry 6 - Andee Graves M2H Designs

Then look at the other areas of the snowflake that you might want to open up. This is how you can really change the look of your snowflakes even when they are crocheted from the same pattern.

In the case of the Sparkling Ice Snowflake I added 2 pins to each point in the ch-2 spaces  to square up the points of the snowflake, or….

Placing the 2 additional pins in the ch-3 spaces creates a pointed look.

Painting on stiffener - Andee Graves M2H Designs

Now it is time to brush on the stiffening solution. I usually pin my snowflakes wrong side facing up and brush on the stiffening solution to set the shape. I keep brushing the solution to help it absorb and get deep into the stitches. Usually your thread will change color enough that you can see where you still need to brush on more solution.

Once the solution is dry I carefully un-pin the snowflake. Usually this isn’t stiff enough to hang, so I will turn over the snowflake and paint the other side of it with a light coating of stiffening solution. The shape of the snowflake is already set though and I don’t pin it in place again.

If you want to add some sparkle to your snowflake this is a good time to add glitter.  Sprinkle glitter over the wet surface. Tap off any excess and set aside to finish drying.

5 snowflakes 2 sizes Sparkling Ice - Andee Graves M2H Designs

I usually move the snowflake to the drying surface after painting on the second coating of stiffener to prevent it from sticking to the work surface. If you are in a humid climate you may want to un-pin and move your snowflake to the drying surface once it is mostly dry and set from the first coat, this will help it dry quicker.

Nylon Hanger - Andee Graves M2H Designs

Once your snowflakes are completely dry use ribbon or light weight nylon line to create hangers. I prefer the nylon line because it is nearly invisible. I usually use about 4-6 inches and thread it thru an opening on the edge of the snowflake and tie a knot over the 2 ends.

Have fun making snowflakes.

 

This post contains affiliate links. I may receive compensation (at no added cost to you) if you make a purchase using these links.

Dizzy Corner Afghan Square

Tomorrow is my birthday and I am keeping with my tradition of celebrating with a blog pattern for my readers. Once again I wanted to have some fun with my favorite crochet technique: Spirals. I also wanted to play with some textures in this project and incorporated clusters and cross stitches for that aspect.

The result is my “Dizzy Corner Afghan Square”.

Working spirals can be a little tricky, and this spiral is made with 2 arms in 2 colors. I’ve used my favorite method of spiral making using stitch markers to help keep track of the increases and the ends of each round.

You mark each stitch of Round 1, using a different color stitch marker for the last stitch in each color.

In the following 4 rounds you work 1 stitch in each unmarked stitch and 2 stitches in each marked stitch, moving the stitch marker up to the 2nd stitch.

End of Round 5 Spiral stitches

When you work a continuous spiral in crochet you will need a step-up and a step-down to get a perfect round. At the beginning of Round 1 the first stitch is a single crochet followed by 3 half double crochets to create the step-up.

Then Round 5 of the spiral ends with a step down. In the instructions for the pattern I have broken out the step-down instructions at the end of Round 5.

Dizzy Corner Afghan Square

Designed by Andee Graves

Skill level:       Intermediate

Finished Size:

12” square

Materials:

Yarn

Worsted wt (Sample uses Lion Brand Yarns “Vanna’s Choice” 100% Acrylic (5 oz/142g, 251 yd/230 m)

Color A: #159 Lemon (sample used approximately 22 yards/12 grams)

Color B: #112 Raspberry (sample used approximately 20 yards/11 grams)

Color C {primary color}: #171 Fern (sample used approximately 62 yards/35 grams)

Color D: # 098 Fisherman (sample used approximately 30 yards/17 grams)

Hook

J / 6mm

Notions

Yarn/tapestry needle

Stitch markers

Gauge

First 5 rounds of pattern = 4” across square

Abbreviations/Special Stitches

Standing Double Crochet (Standing dc): make slip knot in yarn and place loop snugly on shaft of hook, yo and insert hook into indicated st, yo, pull up a loop, (yo, pull thru 2 loops on hook) twice.

Standing Single Crochet (Standing sc): make slip knot in yarn and place loop snugly on shaft of hook, insert hook into indicated st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull thru 2 loops on hook.

Loose slip stitch (loose slip st): Insert hook in indicated place, YO, pull up a loop thru place and loop on hook keeping loose like making a chain st.

Joining slip st (slip st): Insert hook in indicated place, YO, pull up a loop thru place and loop on hook, continue to pull up on working loop until original loop is tight.

Extended Double Crochet (Edc): YO, insert hook in indicated st or sp, YO pull up a loop, YO pull thru first loop on hook, (YO, pull thru 2 loops on hook) 2 times.

2 double crochet Cluster (Cl): (YO, insert hook in indicated st or sp, YO pull up a loop, YO pull thru 2 loops) 2 times, YO pull thru remaining loops on hook.

Double Crochet Cross Stitch (X-st): Skip one st, dc in next st, working around previously made dc, dc in skipped st. Each X-st uses 2 sts and creates 2 sts.

Pattern Notes:

Start square with an adjustable slip knot. Beginning tail tightens the loop on the hook.

Stitch counts at the end of each round and row are shown in italicized brackets at end of each round or row.

Square starts with a 2 color hdc spiral circle in one corner, then rounds to square the circle. Next 16 textured mitered rows are worked off 2 sides of that square, ending with 2 rounds of sc encasing entire afghan square.

When instructions specify “sl st loosely”, this means work those slip stitches similar to a chain stitch and do not pull the working loop to tighten them as in a joining slip stitch. You will be working into those loose slip stitches.

Instructions

Rnd 1 (RS): Begin with Color A, ch 2, (sc, 3 hdc) in second ch from hook, pull up long loop of color A and remove hook, insert hook in same ch as previous work, pull up a loop of Color B on shaft of hook, ch 1, (sc, 3 hdc) in same ch st, pull beginning tail of Color A to close center tightly. Place st markers in each st using a different color marker to indicate the last st of each color section. [1 sc, 3 hdc, in each color]

Rnd 2: Begin with Color A, *(2 hdc in marked st, move st marker up to second st worked) 4 times*, pull up loop of Color A, switch to Color B, Repeat from * to *. [8 hdc, in each color]

Rnd 3: Begin with Color A, *(hdc in next st, 2 hdc in marked st, move st marker up to second st worked) 4 times*, pull up loop of Color A, switch to color B, Repeat from * to *. [12 hdc, in each color]

Rnd 4: Begin with Color A, *(hdc in next 2 sts, 2 hdc in marked st, move st marker up to second st worked) 4 times*, pull up loop of Color A, switch to Color B, Repeat from * to *. [16 hdc, in each color]

Rnd 5: Begin with Color A, *(hdc in next 3 sts, 2 hdc in marked st, move st marker up to second st worked) 4 times*, pull up loop of Color A, switch to color B, Repeat from * to * once, [Count at this point is 20 hdc in each color]

step down: **hdc next st, sc next st, slip st loosely in back loop and back bar of next st, slip st tightly in back loop and back bar of next st**, fasten off Color B, switch back to Color A, Repeat from ** to ** once, fasten off Color A. [21 hdc, 1 sc, 2 slip st, in each color] 4”diameter.

To prepare for  working round to square, remove every other st marker leaving 4 markers equally spaced around circle.

Rnd 6: With RS facing attach Color C yarn with a standing dc in any marked st, 2 Edc in same st, *skip 2 sts, hdc next st, hdc & sc next st, sc next st, sc & hdc next st, hdc next st, skip 2 sts, (2 Edc, dc, ch 2, dc, 2 Edc) nextmarked st, move marker to ch-2 sp just made*; Repeat from * to * 2 times; skip 2 sts, hdc next st, hdc & sc next st, sc next st, sc & hdc next st, hdc next st, skip 2 sts, (2 Edc, dc) in first worked st, ch 2, slip st to first dc of Rnd. [16 Edc, 8 dc, 16 hdc, 12 sc, 4 ch-2 sp]

Rnd 7: Ch 1, *sc in next 13 sts, (sc, ch 2, sc) in marked ch-2 sp*; Repeat from * to * 3 times, slip st to first st of Rnd, fasten off Color C. [60 sc]

Row 8: With RS facing attach Color D with a standing sc in corner ch-2 sp, sc next 15 sts, (sc, ch 2, sc) in next corner ch-2 sp, sc next 15 sts, sc in next corner ch-2 sp. [34 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 9: Ch 1, turn, sc in first st, *Cl next st, sc next st*; Repeat from * to * until work in st before corner ch-2 sp, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, sc next st, Repeat from * to * until work in last st of previous row. [16 Cl, 1 ch-2 sp, 18 sc]

Row 10: Ch 1, turn, sc in first st, sc in each st until work in last st before corner ch-2 sp, (sc, ch 2, sc) in corner ch-2 sp, sc in each st until work in last st of previous row. Fasten off Color D. [38 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 11: With RS facing attach Color C with standing dc, dc in each st toward corner until work in last st before ch-2 sp, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in ch-2 sp, dc in each st away from corner until work in last st of previous row, Fasten off Color C. [42 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 12: With RS facing attach Color A with standing sc, Repeat Row 10. [42 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 13: Turn, sc in first st, ch 2, *X-st over next 2 sts*, Repeat from * to * 9 times, dc next st, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in ch-2 sp, dc next st, Repeat from * to * 10 times, dc in last st of previous row. [20 X-sts, 8 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 14: Repeat Row 10 in Color A, Fasten off Color A. [50 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 15: With RS facing attach Color C with standing dc, Repeat Row 11, Fasten off Color C. [54 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 16: With RS facing attach Color B with standing sc, Repeat Row 10. [56 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 17: Ch 1, turn, (sc next st, dc next st) 14 times, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 corner space, (dc next st, sc next st) 14 times. [28 dc, 30 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 18: Ch 1, turn, Repeat Row 10, Fasten off Color B. [60 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 19: With RS facing attach Color C with standing dc, Repeat Row 11, Fasten off Color C. [64 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 20: With RS facing attach Color D with standing sc, Repeat Row 10. [66 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 21: Turn, sc in first st, ch 2, *X-st over next 2 sts*, Repeat from * to * 15 times, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in ch-2 sp, Repeat from * to * 16 times, dc in last st of previous row. [32 X-sts, 6 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Row 22: Repeat Row 10, Fasten off Color D. [72 sc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Weave in all tails so far.

Row 23: With RS facing attach Color C with standing dc, Repeat Row 11, DO NOT fasten off Color C. [76 dc, 1 ch-2 sp]

Edging Rounds

Rnd 1: With RS facing turn work counter clockwise to work along edges of Rows, ch 1, 2 sc in side of Row 23, sc in side of Row 22, 2 sc in side of Row 21, sc in side of Row 20, 2 sc in side of Row 19, sc in side of Row 18, sc in side of Row 17, sc in side of Row 16, 2 sc in side of Row 15, sc in side of Row 14, 2 sc in side of Row 13, sc in side of Row 12, 2 sc in side of Row 11, sc in side of Row 10, sc in side of Row 9, sc in side of Row 8, sc in corner ch-2 sp of beginning square, sc in next 15 sts,

(sc, ch 2, sc) in next corner ch-2 sp,

sc in next 15 sts, sc in next corner ch-2 sp of beginning square, sc in side of Row 8, sc in side of Row 9, sc in side of Row 10, 2 sc in side of Row 11, sc in side of Row 12, 2 sc in side of Row 13, sc in side of Row 14, 2 sc in side of Row 15, sc in side of Row 16, sc in side of Row 17, sc in side of Row 18, 2 sc in side of Row 19, sc in side of Row 20, 2 sc in side of Row 21, sc in side of Row 22, 2 sc in side of Row 23,

ch 2, turn and sc in top of first st of Row 23, sc in next 37 sts,

(sc, ch 2, sc) in next corner ch-2 sp,

sc in next 38 sts, ch 2, slip st to first sc of Rnd 1. [156 sc, 4 ch-2 sp]

Rnd 2: Ch 1, *sc in each st until work in last st before ch-2 sp, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp*; Repeat from * to * 3 times, slip st to first sc of Rnd 2, fasten off. [164 sc, 4 ch-2 sp]

Finishing

Weave in tails and block.

 

 

When a Motif isn’t a Motif

This past week has been another whirlwind as I was preparing for the Scottsbluff Fiber Arts Fair. Today was all about Needle Felting, I taught 2 classes on the subject.

The morning class was “Needle Felting in 3D” and my afternoon class was “Sweet Sheep Toy: Needle Felting”. Both classes were well attended and I had such a great time with my students.

The sheep class students really applied themselves to the project, and everyone left with a new appreciation for how to create needle felt toys.  Tomorrow I’ll be teaching a Learn to Crochet class for Knitters “The Crocheted Edge”. This was a fun class I originally developed for teaching at the Longmont Yarn Shoppe. I’m looking forward to helping my fellow yarn crafters add crochet to their skills.

Speaking of crochet. I’m so excited to show you my 2 latest designs to be published in the October issue of the online magazine “I Like Crochet”.  Both of these designs were inspired by the idea of working fabric that has the appearance of little motifs without all the joining and tail weaving usually involved in that type of fabric. Instead the look of motifs is created by working continuous rows and using spike stitches gather the rows together. The edging and finish for each project is also worked continuously , so when you are finished with the crocheting, all you have left is weaving in a few ends and blocking

The “Sugar & Fig Cowl” is made in Berroco Yarns “Boboli Lace”, this is a colorful yarn with a lovely subtle sheen. The “motifs” are created in a 2 row repeat that is easy to memorize so you’ll have your cowl finished before you know it.

The “Cobbled Path Wrap” is a rectangular stole crocheted in Premier Yarns’ Deborah Norville “Serenity Sock”. The motif look in this design is worked in a 3 row repeat giving the look of ovals. This repeat is a tiny bit more challenging, but with the length of the wrap you will get into the swing of it pretty easily.

Both designs were worked in fingering weight yarns with lots of fluidity for finished projects with lovely drape and wearability.

If you don’t have a subscription to “I Like Crochet” then now is a great time to get one. This issue is filled with a number of lovely projects that can help you celebrate the fall season and that would make great gifts for the holidays.

2 by 2 Cowl Pattern

Hello my dear readers. May has been zipping by and I can’t believe there are only 2 weeks left of the school year for my boys. This summer is already beginning to look very busy. Between fiber arts conferences and family trips I’ll be on the go pretty much non-stop.

This is my newest design the “2 by 2 Cowl”.  I wanted to start the summer off with a fun pattern for everyone that doesn’t take a lot of yarn and is relatively small to have in your hands or lap when the temperatures start to rise. It uses only 1 skein of Lion Brand’s “Heartland” yarn with a size J hook.

This was all that was left of my skein of yarn when I finished the sample, just 5 grams or a little under 9 yards.

I start this cowl with my favorite foundation: Stacked Rows. If you need a little help with understanding how to work a stacked rows foundation I created a video to help you. You can find it here on my YouTube Channel. For those of you that are ready, let’s jump right into the pattern.

2 by 2 Cowl

Designed by Andee Graves

Skill – Easy

Stitches you need to know: Chain (ch), Double Crochet (dc), Single Crochet (sc), slip stitch (slip st)

Finished size: Approximately 14” wide x 34” around (35cm x 85cm)

Materials

Yarn: Lion Brand Yarns “Heartland”; 100% Acrylic, 142 grams/5 oz, 230m/251 yards. (sample was made with 1 ball of color #147 Hot Springs)

Hook: J-10/6mm, or size needed to obtain gauge

Blunt yarn needle

Gauge:

6 rows and 16 stitches in pattern = 4” (10cm)

Pattern Notes

Foundation is worked in stacked rows to create a scalloped and elastic circle that the rest of the cowl is built off of.

Body of the cowl is worked in joined rounds off the straight side of the stacked row foundation. Look for the hole at the base of the double crochet rows to find the single crochet row to work into when crocheting Round 1.

Instructions

Foundation:

Row 1: Ch 2, sc in 2nd ch from hook.

Row 2: Ch 3, turn, 2 dc in sc.

Row 3: Ch 1, turn, sc in first dc.

Rows 4 – 65: Alternate repeating Row 2 and Row 3

Row 66: Repeat Row 2, join strip of rows into a circle without twisting, slip st to base of Row 1. {33 Scallops, 33 sc rows}

Body of Cowl:

Rnd 1: Turn to work along straight side of foundation rows, ch 3 {counts as dc here and thru-out pattern}, dc in side of first sc row, *skip next dc row, ch 2, 2 dc in side of next sc row; repeat from * until work in last sc row of foundation, ch 2, slip st to top of beginning ch-3. [66 dc, 66 ch-2 sp]

Rnd 2: Turn, (loosely slip st, ch 3, dc) in first ch-2 sp, skip 2 dc sts, ch 2, 2 dc in next ch-2 sp; repeat from * until work in last ch-2 sp of previous row, ch 2, slip st to top of beginning ch-3. [66 dc, 66 ch-2 sp]

Rnds 3 – 21: Repeat Row 2.

Rnd 22: Do Not Turn, ch 1, *sc in first dc, ch 2, 2 dc next dc, skip next ch-2 sp; repeat from * until work in last dc of Rnd 21, slip st to top of first sc of Rnd. Fasten off

Weave in all loose tails. Gently block if desired.

The Luck of the Irish

Today is Saint Patrick’s Day, and my family has a little Irish heritage (we are a classic American family with a big mixture of ancestry from all over Northern Europe and the British Isles), so I thought I would come up with a fun little crochet pattern for making a lucky 4 leaf clover.

Funny enough, none of us have much in the way of green clothing, every year I think that I really should at least get the boys some green clothing. That thought has not translated to my shopping brain yet. I tend to purchase whichever shirts are on sale, since both of my boys are a bit rough on their clothes.  Instead I crocheted up lucky clovers and made them into pins the boys could wear.

For those of you that are wondering about Shamrocks versus 4 Leaf Clover. The typical Irish symbol is the 3 lobed clover and is called a shamrock. 4 lobed clovers are much rarer and are not “officially” considered a symbol of Ireland or Saint Patricks day. The shamrock with it’s 3 lobes is said to have been used by St. Patrick to demonstrate the holy trinity of Christian faith. The 4 Leaf Clover is said to symbolize luck because they are so rare.

I had a lot of fun playing with a way to create a 4 Leaf Clover that could be worked in just 2 rounds. This project is rated at the intermediate level, because I used some more advanced techniques like Clusters and working in the back bump of chains.  If you need help with working clusters I have a photo tutorial in the Special Stitches section of the pattern.

Luck of the Irish Clover

Design by Andee Graves

Skill level: Intermediate

Materials:

Yarn – Lion Brand “Vanna’s Choice”, 100% Acrylic (3.5 oz/100g, 170 yds/156m) Color #171 Fern

Hook – I/9 – 5mm hook

Pin back or safety pin to attach to back of clover.

Special Stitches

3 DC Cluster (Cl):

Photo A

To make a 3 dc cluster st, yarn over (yo) like making a dc and insert in st or sp, yo, pull up a loop (3 loops on hook), yo {Photo A},

Photo B

pull thru 2 loops on hook (2 loops remaining on hook, 1st base made), yo, insert in same st or sp, yo, pull up a loop (4 loops on hook), yo {Photo B},

Photo C

pull thru 2 loops (3 loops remaining on hook, 2nd base made), yo, insert in same st or sp, yo, pull up a loop (5 loops on hook), yo, pull thru 2 loops (4 loops remaining on hook, 3rd base made), yo {Photo C}, pull thru all 4 loops on hook.

Instructions:

Round 1: Start with an Adjustable slip knot, ch 3, 7 hdc in 3 ch from hook, gently pull beginning tail to close center,

slip st under 2 loops (the “V” front of the ch st) at top of beginning ch-3 to join the round.

Round 2: {Thanks to Edith for the correction.}  Ch 3, *(Cl, ch 3 and slip st) in next st,** (slip st, ch 3) in next st*;

Repeat from * to * 2 times, Repeat from * to ** once,

Stem: Ch 6, working in back bumps, sc in 2nd ch from hook and in next 3 ch sts, slip st in last ch, cut yarn with 4-5 inches of tail. Stem will curl, it is supposed to.

Weave ending tail toward center, use tails to sew on a pin backing.

I hope you have a very lucky Saint Patrick’s Day, and some fun wearing a 4 Leaf Clover.

Shells on the Aegean Neck Cozy

shells-on-the-aegean-neck-cozy-andee-graves-m2h-designs

It has been so cold the last couple of weeks that I thought it was time for a warm neck cozy pattern. Because it buttons to fasten around your neck, this snuggly short scarf takes less yarn than a full size scarf.  Just a little under 315 yards of worsted weight yarn. I used Caron Yarns “Simply Soft” for the sample you see.

remaining-yarn

This is all I had left of the 1 skein I used. That is a U.S. Quarter next to it to give you a frame of reference.

Here is the Pattern:

Shells on the Aegean Neck Cozy

Designed by Andee Graves

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS

Neck Cozy is 13.25”/ 33.125cm wide (lace scarf section) x 30”/ 75cm long.

YARN

Caron Simply Soft (100% Acrylic; 315 yds/288m = 6 ounces/170.1g)

#9767 Royal Blue: 1 skein sample used nearly all of skein

CROCHET HOOKS

Size US I-9 / 5.5mm

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS

Yarn needle

1 – 1” button (shank style works best)

GAUGE

5 rows & 4 sts in single crochet = 1”

SPECIAL STITCHES

Shell Stitch (Shl): (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in indicated st or sp.

V-stitch (V-st): (dc, ch 2, dc) in indicated st or sp. 

Picot stitch (picot): Ch 3, sl st in top of previous st. If you need help with the making the picot stitch I have a tutorial here on the blog.

flat-view-shells-on-the-aegean-andee-graves-m2h-designs 

Pattern Notes

This Neck Cozy is worked in 2 parts, the Button Band and the Lace Scarf.

Be sure to work the base chain loosely for ease of working into the bottom of the foundation row when crocheting the lace scarf part of project. If having problems keeping the chain loose enough, use a hook one size larger to make the chain then switch to the smaller hook for the rest of the project.

When counting stitches for skipping, chain stitches count as one stitch each.

INSTRUCTIONS 

Button Band

Row 1 (RS): Ch 32, working in back bumps sc in 2nd ch from hook and each ch back to beginning. [31 sc]

Row 2: Ch 1, turn, sc in each st to end of row. [31 sc]

Row 3: Repeat Row 2.

Row 4: Ch 7 (creates button loop), turn, sc in each st to end of row. [31 sc, 1 ch-7 loop]

Rows 5 & 6: Repeat Row 2 twice.

Row 7: Ch 1, turn, sc in next 31 sts, (button loop finishing) picot, [(2 dc, picot) 6 times, 2 dc] into ch-7 loop, sl st to end of Row 1. DO NOT Fasten off.

Lace scarf

Row 1: (Working along bottom of foundation of button band Row 1) Ch 3, 3 dc in first st, ch 1 (sk 2 sts, V-st in next st) 9 times, ch 1, sk 2 sts, 3 dc in last st. [9 V-sts, 2 ch-1 sps, 6 dc]

Row 2 (RS) : Ch 3, turn, sk 1 st, 3 dc in next st, ch 1, (Shl in next ch-2 sp, V-st in next ch-2 sp) 4 times, Shl in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, sk 3 sts, 3 dc in next st. [5 Shls, 4 V-sts, 2 ch-1 sps, 6 dc]

Row 3: Ch 3, turn, sk 1 st, 3 dc in next st, (ch 1, V-st in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, Shl in next ch-2 sp) 4 times, ch 1, V-st in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, sk 5 sts, 3 dc in next st. [5 V-sts, 4 Shls, 10 ch-1 spcs, 6 dc]

Rows 4: Ch 3, turn, sk 1 st, 3 dc in next st, (ch 1, Shl in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, V-st in next ch-2 sp) 4 times, ch 1, Shl in next ch-2 sp, ch 1, sk 3 sts, 3 dc in next st. [5 Shls, 4 V-sts, 10 ch-1 sps, 6 dc]

Rows 5 – 50: Alternate repeating Rows 3 & 4, 22 times.

Row 51: Ch 1, turn, sc in each of next 3 sts, (*sl st in ch-1 sp, sc next 2 sts, sk next st, 5 sc in next ch-2 sp, sk 1 st, sc in next 2 sts, sl st in ch-1 sp,* sk next st, 5 sc next ch-2 sp, sk 1 st) 4 times, repeat from * to * once, sc in each of last 3 sts. Fasten off. [71 sc, 10 sl sts]

FINISHING

Weave in ends. Block lightly, if desired.

Sew button to RS of button band on Row 4 at opposite end from button loop.